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Friday, August 21, 2015

Duality in architecture: the spirit of this space!

By Savitha Hira
Photography: Masao Nishikawa; courtesy APOLLO Architects & Associates

building in exposed concrete
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Ar. Satoshi Kurosaki works on the principles of architectural duality to create yet another inward-looking home in Tokyo that gives no inkling of what lies within...

As a cube of exposed reinforced concrete and bronze tinted glass with strategic cut-outs that frame two trees, the home responds to an inner courtyard juxtaposed along its L-shaped layout and an aesthetic interior that comes alive with an enviable art collection.
 
luxurious living room interiors
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glass wall in living room
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Home to an expat couple and their young daughter, the layout features a basement and two upper floors. Public areas are separated and get the best views by being designed on the upper floor with private areas relegated to the more enclosed spaces. A neutral envelope, which acts as the perfect canvas to showcase the family’s art heirlooms...

colourful art
©.A N) mikaninagawa
framing the exterior view
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Primary colours of the art pieces by Mika Ninagawa add stimulation to the space, bouncing off and coexisting with each other; complemented by diffused light from high windows and skylights formulating fine fluctuations and comfortable natural light seeping in via the courtyard, illuminating the basement as well. And to complete the picture, we have the symbolic tree view that creates borrowed scenery.

duality in architecture
©.A N) mikaninagawa
natural light filtering indoors
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But what strikes most about this seemingly simple abode with a strong aesthetic is a physically powerful duality that not just coexists with aplomb, but could be considered as the design loci of the home: longitudinal openings that bring the light streaming in infuse an aura of buoyancy against the raw appeal of the exposed concrete envelope; concrete floors and ceiling are pitted against glass walls; glass balustrades and fragile-looking skeletal stairs against an all-wood enclosure; gloss-coated surfaces and chic furniture and furnishings blending in with the gray and beige...
 
framing the exterior view
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It all at once brings to mind the concept of duality in architecture. Well explored by renowned architect Mies van der Rohe and several architects after him, this home is a discerning study in a dichotomy of design elements.

2 comments :

  1. I can truly appreciate the space. Perfection. However, I don't want to live in it. Even the bookcases are empty. Living environments aren't just "spaces" to illustrate the architect's concepts and talents. I want both this kind of beauty in an atmosphere I can feel embraced by. I'm not embraced here.

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