Advertise Here

Monday, December 17, 2012

cSigns: a boon for the visually impaired


By Anuradha K. R.
Photography: Courtesy Rob Caslick


Capitalising on the fact that 90% of the blind can actually see light, Rob Caslick set out on the untrodden path that led to the conceptualization of “cBraille” and consequently the development of “cSigns”, opening up new possibilities of wayfaring signage that can assist the visually-challenged, better traverse through the public domain.

cBraille started as an art exhibition with an aim to raise awareness about the importance of light to people with vision impairment. The exhibition, housed in a custom-built shipping container, had on display, 14 panels of LED lights arranged in the Braille code and each panel enlightened the user with some beautiful quote on light and blindness.

.

.

Rob, a mechanical engineer and industrial designer and the brain behind cBraille has designed this in a way that enables visually-challenged individuals, blessed with even minimum light perception to actually SEE the Braille. He’s done this by simply representing each dot in the Braille code with a 3mm dome-tipped LED, ensuring that they don’t need to learn anything new in order to use this interface. They’re just expected to use their light perception to locate the Braille and then read the tips of the Braille with their fingers, as they normally would, to be benefitted by the exhibition.

.

.

The success of the exhibition set Rob’s team thinking on the practical applications of cBraille and arrived at an idea that would make signage in public places accessible on an equitable basis to all. cSigns, as they’re called, are statutory signage and room numbering with back-lit text and Braille combo. cSigns uses standard Braille and is compliant with current building codes in Australia. They’re being increasingly used in Aged Care Homes and hospitals to help people of all vision types locate their rooms and other facilities with ease.

.

.

With cSigns being the patented technology behind the cBraille exhibition and emerging as the winner of the Sydney & Melbourne Design Awards 2012, its role in bringing about positive change in the visually challenged domain stands duly recognized.  

.

No comments :

Post a Comment