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Friday, July 29, 2016

Paved Interpretation!

By FinchD
Photography: courtesy v2com
Read Time: 2 mins

©Maxime Brouillet

Ar. Jean Verville designs a joyous, experiential dance floor installation – a perfect adjunct to the ongoing “Pompeii” exhibition at the adjoining Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Canada.

A competition win, the dance floor is an interactive urban landscape, designed as an avenue with a paving exceeding 5000 footprints. Running along the wall of the Michal and RenataHornstein Pavilion, the erstwhile Art Gallery for the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, dance floor aims at developing the street for public interactions.

©Maxime Brouillet

Combinations of black and metallic gold hues allude to the ambivalence of decadence and death of the destructed city of Pompeii, expressed in the exhibition. Fronting the Garden of Sculptures, another temporary summer installation by the museum, the pavement celebrates the importance of public street art, its mosaic of shimmering gold footprints transforming it into a pulsating trompe-l’oeil.

©Maxime Brouillet

The multifaceted promenade thus invites the visitors to break into impromptu acts and performances, creating an invigorating and inclusive public domain. While the pavement itself allures miscellaneous interactive activities, the benches are an ideal instance of street furniture. 

©Fran├žois Bodlet
©Maxime Brouillet

The dance floor is a multi-purpose urban installation, simultaneously a stage and a house arena, transitioning into a concrete park, an art gallery or simply a promenade as per the users. The dynamic landscape fosters an experiential flow of movements and interactions, which in turn creates opportunities for an understanding and intrinsic appreciation of public spaces. The street thus animates the downtown Montreal area and gives a boost to the visitors of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, encouraging them to explore unique paths and tours through the same.

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